While there will always be technological developments in the aviation industry, it is for the most part, a mature industry. On the other hand, the drone industry, measured against fixed wing and rotorcraft, is probably in the range of 20 percent mature. While drones have, in the defense world, been in use for decades, it’s only been in the last few years that drone technology has entered the commercial world.… Read More

In Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents (1997), Dr. James Reason defined “just culture” as:

An atmosphere of trust in which people are encouraged, even rewarded, for providing essential safety-related information–but in which they are also clear about where the line must be drawn between acceptable and unacceptable behavior.

While line drawing often involves sensitive tradeoffs and judgments, recent judicial decisions by the courts in Switzerland involving air traffic controllers provoke vigorous head-scratching, not to mention strong condemnation from the international air traffic control community.… Read More

An essential aspect of the aviation industry is doing business with the United States Government.

Whether you’re an airline, a charter or cargo operator, an MRO, a ground handler or a manufacturer, the considerations associated with having the federal government as a client is a world apart from operating in the commercial space.

During this webinar, aviation and government contract attorneys  will discuss not only the basics, but recent developments in dealing with the United States Government as your customer.

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Last month, we passed yet another milestone in aviation history, the 88th anniversary of the first attempted hijacking of a passenger aircraft.  On February 12, 1931, a group of armed revolutionaries in Peru attempted to seize a Ford tri-motor by force, resulting in a 10 day stand-off.  The crisis was ultimately resolved when the revolutionaries learned there had been a successful coup against the government, and the plane was no longer needed.… Read More

A long long time ago
I can still remember how
That music used to make me smile
And I knew if I had my chance
That I could make those people dance
And maybe they’d be happy for a while

But February made me shiver
With every paper I’d deliver
Bad news on the doorstep
I couldn’t take one more step

I can’t remember if I cried

When I read about his widowed bride
Something touched me deep inside
The day the music died

Lyrics from “American Pie,” by Don McLean, 1971, © Universal Music Publishing Group, BMG Rights Management

The Day the Music Died refers to a fatal Beech Bonanza aircraft crash that occurred 60 years ago yesterday, near Mason City, Iowa. … Read More

In Washington, D.C., the government is still shut down, and is digging out from a weekend storm that dropped a foot of snow.  Neither of these things, however, stopped Department of Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao from unveiling two long-awaited rulemaking efforts that will have a major impact on the future of the unmanned aircraft industry.… Read More

Today we present an update to our story from last month involving an insurance coverage dispute between a wedding photographer and his insurer.  Unfortunately for the photographer, our predication on how this case would come out was correct.

As you will recall, the photographer in question was sued in state court by a wedding guest who claimed that she lost the sight in one eye after the drone hit her.… Read More

After nearly ten years of work, the FAA has finally issued a new set of comprehensive regulations governing “air charter brokers” and how they operate. According to the Department of Transportation, these new rules are intended to “facilitate innovation and growth in the air charter industry while strengthening the legal protections provided to consumers of charter air transportation.”

In addition, in 2019, the FAA and DOT will be conducting increased surveillance, oversight, and enforcement of charter operators and brokers.… Read More