Thank you for joining us for our webinar: The FAA Reauthorization Act: What is in it and what does it mean for you? We had a great turnout and appreciate your continued support of our Aviation Webinar Series.

If you missed this webinar and would like to view the slides or listen to the presentation

This free webinar, from our Emergency Response and Preparedness Practice Attorneys, is not only for pipeline companies, it can provide information for airports, insurance risk managers, and other pipeline related UAS operators.

We are pleased to join the Energy Drone Coalition in presenting this webinar, which will explain how pipeline companies can leverage their existing processes to obtain DHS certification that limits liability in the event of a terrorist attack.  As pipeline operators are aware, the terrorist risk they face is broader and more multifarious than the risks faced by other industries. The government’s recognition of this risk is evident from the TSA’s creation of Pipeline Security Guidelines.  What you might not know is the procedures you already have in place to minimize the risk of intentional damage to critical infrastructure can also save your company from ruinous monetary judgments through the protections afforded by the SAFETY Act.
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On August 28th the Denver Post reported that the Denver Police Department had shelved a consumer-grade drone recently purchased for nearly $3,000 after the administration nixed the crime lab’s plan to use it to photograph crime scenes.  Meanwhile, the Denver Fire Department intends to move forward with plans to purchase an Aeryon SkyRanger to use when dealing with all sorts of incidents, including structure fires, hazardous material spills and rescues. The difference between the failure of one program and the likely success of the other appears to turn on public perception.

This real world example highlights the critically important task of considering the risk or benefit to your reputation or brand as a result of your drone program.  Members of the public often have a visceral, negative reaction to drones. A poorly implemented program can anger customers, industry partners, and the public, thereby tarnishing a well-earned reputation and cause the demise of your program. At the extreme, angry landowners have been known to shoot down drones.  On the other hand, a well implemented program can position you as an industry leader using cutting-edge technology to provide the best, most reliable electric service while ensuring the safety of your employees.
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Everyone – Once again, the general optimism that the Senate finally had its act together and was going to vote on FAA Reauthorization has given way to disappointment.  Despite numerous aviation groups writing Senator McConnell urging quick action, there is still no vote scheduled.  According to recent reports, the process is still mired in “behind

A few days ago, Richard Russell, a 29 year old airline ground employee, got in a 76 seat commercial aircraft and took off from a crowded airport. Many people expressed surprise that he was able to accomplish this feat given the complexity of a modern commercial aircraft, noting that even starting the engines is a multistep process.  In addition, he showed a fair amount of skill in flying the aircraft.  Despite this, it appears he had no training in commercial multiengine aircraft and little, if any, formal pilot training.

In this instance, the troubled young man may have been suicidal, but fortunately, he was not murderous. After his joyride in the aircraft, it appears he intentionally crashed the plane into an uninhabited area.  But what if his intentions had been different?  Once he was airborne, it would have been a simple task for him to have crashed the plane, and its full load of fuel, into the terminal or another aircraft full of passengers.  During a busy travel day, the potential loss of life would be staggering.


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If you don’t know how to say “An Airplane Is Down . . . In a Foreign County” in Spanish, Farsi, Chinese or German, you must attend our 2019 Aviation Symposium!

In our 13th annual symposium, we will focus on, among other things, aviation accidents, incidents and events occurring outside the United States.  Discussions will

Thank you for joining us yesterday on our webinar: Waivers, Exemptions, and Certification: How to get permission to do what you want with your Unmanned Aircraft. We had a great turnout and appreciate your continued support of our Aviation Webinar Series.

If you happened to miss this webinar and would like to view/listen to the

Anyone who operates a regional or nationwide business knows that coping with a patchwork of state and local laws can be challenging. Fortunately, the states also realize that this can be a problem, and will sometimes cooperate to voluntarily establish a “uniform” law.  For example, in 1952, a group of top legal scholars from the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) got together and drafted the Uniform Commercial Code.  This code has been adopted (with some variations) in every state, and has greatly improved predictability for business owners.

Over the past five years, most states have enacted laws regarding the use of unmanned aircraft. These laws vary wildly in what they permit and prohibit.  Right now, however, the NCCUSL is working on solving this problem by creating the uniform Tort Law Relating To Drones Act.  As with the Uniform Commercial Code, the NCCUSL hopes that every state will quickly adopt the Act as the basis for its state drone laws.


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